Asian Blepharoplasty

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Asian eyelid surgery

Asian Blepharoplasty Dallas

Asian eyelid surgery is a topic Dr. Lam has trained extensively in and is familiar with all the techniques, offering his patients the widest range of surgical options to achieve the desired look. In his book, “Cosmetic Surgery of the Asian Face, Dr. Lam instructs other physicians how to perform these different Asian eyelid procedures correctly. This landmark publication represents the only major textbook on Asian facial cosmetic surgery in the English language..

All Asian Blepharoplasty procedures are performed by Dr Lam himself, at his cosmetic surgery center in Dallas, Texas. To schedule a Asian eyelid surgery consultation call 1-888-866-3388 or email us . The details of your Asian eyelid procedure (both the limitations and the benefits in your particular situation) will be explained to you during your Asian eyelid consultation with Dr. Lam and his team.

Asian Blepharoplasty Procedures

thumbs_8Creation of a natural-appearing “double eyelid”
Asian upper-eyelid surgery represents the most common surgical procedure for the Asian face. Two decades ago, “Westernization” of the upper eyelid constituted the most frequent request for those who elected to undergo this type of procedure. Today, many Asians recognize that a very high lid crease and overzealous removal of upper-lid fat impart a foreign and unnatural look to their face. Furthermore, a hollow eye that may appear attractive on a Caucasian face may indicate premature aging in the Asian patient.

epicanthoplastyElimination of the “Epicanthal fold”
In addition to Asian double-eyelid surgery, Dr. Lam also performs surgery to soften or eliminate the so-called “epicanthal fold”, the web-like skin fold that drapes over the inner part of the eye. This fold can make the eye look distinctly ethnic and may not always be a desirable trait. In addition, a wide fold can make the nose appear even flatter and broader, and small correction of this fold can improve even the way the nose looks. Inner and outer folds and different eye shapes are all possible with the right surgical technique.

As a result of the Asian double-eyelid procedure, the eye will look wider, more open, and less “sleepy” looking. However, if the patient desires an even wider eye that still appears natural, Dr. Lam offers his technique that addresses the outer side of the eyelid. He can widen the eye even further in conjunction with the double-eyelid procedure and/or the removal of the “epicanthal fold”.

Let’s take a step back and review exactly what the difference is between an eyelid that has no crease and one that does have a crease. An eyelid with a crease or skin fold exhibits the crease by virtue of the attachment of the levator muscle (the muscle that opens the eyelid) to the skin.

The Asian eyelid that has no crease has the levator muscle insert either very low (for partial or low creases) or not at all into the skin so that no crease is visible. The reason that the Asian eyelid appears narrower than the Occidental eye is that the fat (postseptal fat) hangs lower over the eyelid to make the eyelid appear both fatter and the eyelid opening narrower.

In the past, a lot of this puffiness was reduced by removal of fat that would lead to a hollow appearing eye after the procedure or many years down the road. Removal of excessive fat is oftentimes not necessary to “open the eye”. Creation of the crease moves the fat out of the way and creates the same degree of opening in the eyelid aperture. Only about 30% of the time, Dr. Lam encounters excessive fat that needs to be conservatively removed to reduce the puffy appearance of the eyelid. Let’s now review the same anatomy from a different perspective, i.e., from the vantage of what the surgeon encounters during the procedure. After the initial skin incision, the orbicularis muscle is encountered and moved out of the way to visualize a structure known as the orbital septum. The orbital septum holds back the fat that we discussed before and needs to be opened to expose the underlying fat. Immediately below the fat pad lies the glistening white levator muscle (shown as gray in the following illustration). The levator is the structure that is fixated to the skin with sutures to create the levator-to-skin crease that is desired. As mentioned, these sutures are removed after one week when the levator to skin fixation is already durably created during the healing process.

Let’s now review the same anatomy from a different perspective, i.e., from the vantage of what the surgeon encounters during the procedure. After the initial skin incision, the orbicularis muscle is encountered and moved out of the way to visualize a structure known as the orbital septum. The orbital septum holds back the fat that we discussed before and needs to be opened to expose the underlying fat. Immediately below the fat pad lies the glistening white levator muscle (shown as gray in the following illustration). The levator is the structure that is fixated to the skin with sutures to create the levator-to-skin crease that is desired. As mentioned, these sutures are removed after one week when the levator to skin fixation is already durably created during the healing process.

With the full incision method, the precise shape of the eyelid crease can be accurately created. An inside fold refers to how the fold closes downward to touch the epicanthus (the inner part of the eyelid). The inside fold is a more common occurrence in the Asian population and may be considered slightly more “ethnic”. It is commonly paired with a slightly flared crease known as an oval eyelid shape. An outside fold ends further inside the epicanthus and does not touch close down to touch the epicanthus. It is oftentimes paired with a round eyelid configuration in which the crease remains parallel throughout the entire distance of the eyelid. Any of these combinations however are possible and are shown above. Please view our Asian Face Learning Module to learn more.

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