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This podcast talks about balance for the nose and the chin. It’s something that we oftentimes don’t think about. We, oftentimes think, hey, I’ve just got a really large nose Dr. Lam, I got to have this nose reduced, and sometimes by just making the chin bigger, the nose looks smaller. Because they’re oftentimes particularly in Hispanic, Asian, and some African American, it’s a shape of the face where there’s retrogene to the chin. I as an Asian person have that as well. I would actually benefit from a chin implant. But a chin often times, when you, not only bring the chin forward can make the nose smaller, but it makes the profile more balanced. So, it doesn’t recruit backwards where there’s a backward sloping part of the chin. So, when you think about a rhinoplasty sometimes, I may bring into the point of a chin augmentation. And the reason I’m doing that is for full facial balance, and that slope of the chin to me is as important as the position of the chin. Obviously, I do a little bit more augmentation of the chin in men then in women. And the way that I like in this concept, I say this often times if you think of a glass of water on a television screen, and I asked you, how large is this glass of water? You would say, I have no idea because it’s a glass of water on a television screen but as soon as I put a shot glass next to it, the first glass of water looks really large and I haven’t changed the original size. If I put a picture of water next to it, the glass of water looks a lot smaller. And again, I have not changed the original size. So relative balance is so important. So, if you’re thinking about having a rhinoplasty you may think about looking at the chin and that’s when 3D digital imaging may be helpful to look at total balance.

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